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NFL awards Super Bowls to Atlanta, Miami and Los Angeles

The Associated Press

Charlotte, N.C.  — The NFL awarded Super Bowls to Atlanta, Miami and Los Angeles, three cities that made significant financial investments in new stadiums or recently upgraded an existing one.

Atlanta will host the game in 2019, followed by Miami (2020) and Los Angeles (2021), it was announced Tuesday at the NFL owners meetings. New Orleans bid on the 2019 game and was a finalist.

Atlanta will host its third Super Bowl, but the first at its $1.4 billion stadium which opens in 2017. The previous two were at the Georgia Dome.

Miami will have its record-setting 11th Super Bowl following a $450 million stadium renovation. South Florida had been tied with New Orleans for hosting the most Super Bowls.

Los Angeles, which gets the relocated Rams this season, has not hosted a Super Bowl in the area since 1993 in the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. The game will be played at a $2.6 billion stadium in Inglewood, Calif., which opens in 2019.


Statement from New Orleans Saints owner Tom Benson:
"Gayle and I were very proud to stand with our bid team and the entire city of New Orleans in making our presentation today to host the Super Bowl in New Orleans in 2019. While we are disappointed that we were not successful, we congratulate those cities that were awarded the game. We would also like to thank everyone that contributed in making our bid one of the best. As expected, our bid provided new and innovative programs for everyone that would have attended and offered many options so that we would be seriously considered for 2019. The historic Superdome continues to improve with age with its nearly $400 million in state of the art additions and will host another Super Bowl in the future. We are hopeful to be part of the bid process in 2022."

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